Tag Archives: historic

Breathtaking Brittany — Multiple Posts Coming Up!

We’re on the road in Brittany right now — taking a much needed holiday. I’ll have a whole series of posts from Dinan and Morlaix and the Finistere and Quimper. From ancient towns filled with half-timbered or stone buildings to pre-historic standing stones to gothic cathedrals — this part of France is simply stunning.

Just a tease or two — so shhhh — come back soon!

Rooftop Jumble in the historic city of Quimper in the Finistere Brittany, France.

Side entry of the Cathedral in Quimper, Brittany, France.

Standing stones near Camaret-sur-Mer

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The Medieval Abbey of Saint-Pierre-sur-Dives in Normandy

There is no way to miss this impressive abbey from anywhere within the small town of Saint-Pierre-sur-Dives. And it is easily visible as you drive across the Calvados countryside, too. It’s quite wonderful to be living a mere ten minutes away from a place like this.

Founded in 1011 by Countess Lesceline, the aunt of William the Conqueror — the abbey has undergone a variety of extensions and renovations over the subsequent centuries and those renovations continue right into the present day. Here’s a small photo essay of this truly gorgeous abbey.

A glimpse of the medieval abbey towers of Saint-Pierre-sur-Dives can be seen all throughout the town and from several miles/kilometres away as you drive across the landscape of Calvados in Normandy, France. Founded in 1011 by Lesceline, the aunt of William the Conqueror, the abbey has been enlarged, rebuilt, or renovated several times over the following centuries.

A glimpse of the medieval abbey towers of Saint-Pierre-sur-Dives can be seen all throughout the town and from several miles/kilometres away as you drive across the landscape of Calvados in Normandy, France. Founded in 1011 by Lesceline, the aunt of William the Conqueror, the abbey has been enlarged, rebuilt, or renovated several times over the following centuries.

Exterior view of stained glass-filled chapels at the Abbey in Saint-Pierre-sur-Dives.

Exterior view of stained glass-filled chapels at the Abbey in Saint-Pierre-sur-Dives.

Chapel containing the grave of Lesceline, the aunt of William the Conqueror and founder of the abbey in 1011.

Chapel containing the grave of Lesceline, the aunt of William the Conqueror and founder of the abbey in 1011.

The gravestone of Lesceline, the aunt of William the Conqueror and founder of the abbey in 1011.

The gravestone of Lesceline, the aunt of William the Conqueror and founder of the abbey in 1011.

The main altar area of the abbey.

The main altar area of the abbey.

A side aisle in the abbey.

A side aisle in the abbey.

A rather curious set of stairs to nowhere.

A rather curious set of stairs to nowhere.

Abbey interior.

Abbey interior.

Lovely angles and arches.

Lovely angles and arches.

A drawing of the original layout -- much of which on the outer perimeter facing the gardens is being restored at present.

A drawing of the original layout — much of which on the outer perimeter facing the gardens is being restored at present.

These are the buildings along the outer part of the Abbey complex -- the ones that are facing the gardens in the illustration above. The French government sold these buildings off after the Revolution and they have gradually been repurchased. Some of them are in perilous condition and are being properly renovated now.

These are the buildings along the outer part of the Abbey complex — the ones that are facing the gardens in the illustration above. The French government sold these buildings off after the Revolution and they have gradually been repurchased. Some of them are in perilous condition and are being properly renovated now.

Simple chairs against a lovely metalwork enclosure near the main altar.

Simple chairs against a lovely metalwork enclosure near the main altar.

The ever-present candles.

The ever-present candles.

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By The Sea in Aldeburgh, Suffolk, UK

By the sea is where I wish I was right now. But in lieu of that reality, here’s a flashback photo essay from a trip to the lovely seaside town of Aldeburgh in Suffolk in the UK.

By the way, not ALL beaches are sandy. This one is a perfect example of that. Enjoy!

 

Medieval Moot Hall in Aldeburgh, Suffolk, UK, built in 1520, with the village memorial cross to the left.

Medieval Moot Hall in Aldeburgh, Suffolk, UK, built in 1520, with the village memorial cross to the left.


 
A seagull sitting atop one of the medieval brick chimneys on Moot Hall,.

A seagull sitting atop one of the medieval brick chimneys on Moot Hall,.


 
Fishing boats on a gravel, sometimes called shingle, beach in the UK.

Fishing boats on a gravel, sometimes called shingle, beach in the UK.


 
Close-up of a the beautifully coloured pieces of stone comprising a gravel beach, sometimes called a shingle beach, in the UK.

Close-up of a the beautifully coloured pieces of stone comprising a gravel beach, sometimes called a shingle beach, in the UK.


 

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Photo Of The Day: Up The Stairs & Into The Fog

There are days in Normandy when the weather is less than sunny and bright and the fog rolls off the ocean into the seacoast towns.

Today’s picture of the day in black and white is a simple shot — up a set of stairs that are clad in the same cobblestone as the streets below and into the bright but strange light of the fog.

Enjoy!

 

Up the stairs in Granville, a historic seaside town in Normandy, and into the fog at the top of the stairs.

Up the stairs in Granville, a historic seaside town in Normandy, and into the fog beyond. B&W


 

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Back To Bayeux

In several previous posts, I showed you some glimpses of the glorious Bayeux Cathedral, the outside of the Bayeux Tapestry building, and some of the wonderful gargoyles and grotesques on the exterior of the very ornate cathedral.

Today we are just having a bit of a walk around the town itself. It is quite lovely, very walkable size-wise, and is blessed to still have rather a lot of the original architecture since it was less impacted by World War II than most of the Normandy countryside.

 

The charming streets of Bayeux, a very pretty, historic, and walkable town in Normandy, France.

The charming streets of Bayeux, a very pretty, historic, and walkable town in Normandy, France.


 
People walking down a small cobbled street in the shopping district of Bayeux in Normandy, France on a bright and sunny day.

People walking down a small cobbled street in the shopping district of Bayeux in Normandy, France on a bright and sunny day.


 
Looking down a narrow one way street in Bayeux, Normandy, France towards the 11th Century medieval cathedral at the end of the block.

Looking down a narrow one way street in Bayeux, Normandy, France towards the 11th Century medieval cathedral at the end of the block.


 
Close-up details of the upper third of the dark red doors of the Bayeux Cathedral.

Close-up details of the upper third of the dark red doors of the Bayeux Cathedral.


 
A poignant war memorial on a side street in Bayeux, Normandy, France. As a French soldier is shot and begins to fall, the young boy takes the weapon and will carry on.

A poignant war memorial on a side street in Bayeux, Normandy, France. As a French soldier is shot and begins to fall, the young boy takes the weapon and will carry on.


 

Apologies for the return of the slightly larger watermarks again. I discovered several of my images being used on a German website where the person in question posted 3 of my images and claimed that they were his vacation pictures from Paris! Obviously the fact that they were all watermarked (and he cut that part off) and there is a COPYRIGHT notice posted in both my side bar and at the bottom of each page or post made no difference to this man.

After making direct contact with the person and receiving no response, I notified their ISP about their use of my image without payment or attribution. I gave them a link so that they could see that they were indeed my pictures and I told them that I had contacted the person and suggested that they just pay the bill for using the images.

The person in question apparently decided to ignore the issue, even after being contacted by me and by the ISP. So thankfully the ISP stepped in and the man’s site is no longer active. Good! It’s rather scandalous that people continue to troll the internet and use other people’s images as their own — but I am VERY PROACTIVE about pouncing when I discover that sort of blatant theft!

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Iconic Graffiti-Covered Laneway Gets A Makeover in Melbourne

I was surprised to read in this morning’s newspapers online here in Australia that Hosier Lane, a rather well-known graffiti-covered spot in the heart of Melbourne, has had a makeover this week.

This tiny but historic street is amidst the old garment district of Melbourne and the laneway’s name tells you what was once there — hosiers — makers of socks and stockings. I was just there last week taking the photos below, but now it has had a fresh ‘undercoat’ placed on the brick walls and laneway paving so that the graffiti artists can come back and create fresh artwork on a ‘blank canvas’ of blue paint. Curious, or perhaps intentional, that blue was chosen as the background colour since the laneway has a distinct blue overtone due to the quality of light that sifts into the narrow street as the taller buildings loom over it.

Interesting idea — or simply strange? Some of the previous ‘artwork’ was surprisingly well done. It’s all a matter of individual taste and some people will never enjoy the tiny slice of over-the-top-colourful Melbourne across Flinders Street from Federation Square on Hosier Lane.

 

Graffiti covered Hosier Lane in the heart of Melbourne, Australia

Graffiti covered Hosier Lane in the heart of Melbourne, Australia


 
Graffiti covered Hosier Lane in the heart of Melbourne, Australia

Graffiti covered Hosier Lane in the heart of Melbourne, Australia


 
Graffiti covered Hosier Lane in the heart of Melbourne, Australia with the Federation Square entry to the NGV Ian Potter art museum at the end of the laneway across Flinders Street

Graffiti covered Hosier Lane in the heart of Melbourne, Australia with the Federation Square entry to the NGV Ian Potter art museum at the end of the laneway across Flinders Street


 
Graffiti covered Hosier Lane in the heart of Melbourne, Australia

Graffiti covered Hosier Lane in the heart of Melbourne, Australia


 
Graffiti covered Hosier Lane in the heart of Melbourne, Australia

Graffiti covered Hosier Lane in the heart of Melbourne, Australia


 

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Historic Forum Theatre Interior & Reflection in Melbourne, Australia

Go back a few days and you will find the post I made about the lovely old Forum Theatre in Melbourne, Australia. An artist friend of mine, Kate, mentioned that she remembered the beautiful interior of the lobby. So today I am showing you that grandly old-fashioned lobby — followed by a reflection of the marvelous old theatre into the frankly modern exterior of the entry to the NGV Ian Potter art museum at Federation Square which is directly across Flinders Street.

What you can’t really see on the glowing dark blue skies are the tiny stars — and apologies for the slightly fuzzy-focus of the columns. The lighting inside was SO subdued that the camera was having a hard time in all of that darkness.

Enjoy!

 

Interior lobby of the Forum Theatre in Melbourne, Australia

Interior lobby of the Forum Theatre in Melbourne, Australia


 
Ornate columns holding lighting inside the interior lobby of the Forum Theatre in Melbourne, Australia

Ornate columns holding lighting inside the interior lobby of the Forum Theatre in Melbourne, Australia


 
Reflection of the lovely and old Forum Theatre into the starkly new and modern glass facade of Federation Square in Melbourne, Australia

Reflection of the lovely and old Forum Theatre into the starkly new and modern glass facade of Federation Square in Melbourne, Australia


 

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